Premium Content articles are the very best articles from the world's leading internet technology, subject-matter experts. We have many categories of content below on a wide variety of subjects that has all been commissioned from both big name authors.

 

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Photoshop CS2: Levels and Curves
by Linda Goin

Photoshop CS2: Levels and Curves

Photoshop CS2: Adjustment Layers, Levels, and Curves

In this tutorial, Linda explains why Photoshop CS2’s adjustment layers are important to use when altering images, and she begins to illustrate how these layers work with the use of the levels and curves. These two tools can help you to adjust tonal ranges and colour balances within your images manually so that you maintain more control over the outcome rather than using the “automatic” levels and curves adjustments.

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1112 Users read it.

Photoshop CS2: How to Recognize Deceptive Photographs
by Linda Goin

Photoshop CS2: How to Recognize Deceptive Photographs

Photoshop CS2: The Bad and the Ugly

Photographers, graphic designers, and artists now have access to one of the most powerful tools that Adobe’s offered through their Photoshop CS2 software. Digital artists can alter landscapes, touch up faces, and create fantasy images that boggle the mind. Altered images, however, have pervaded the news media through deceptive photojournalism. In this article, Linda offers some infamous and not-so-famous photographic alterations that have been detected over the past century. Accordingly, she’ll lead you through the methods that were used to create these images.

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644 Users read it.

Photoshop: Embedded Colour
by Linda Goin

Photoshop: Embedded Colour

From RGB to CMYK: Embedded Profiles in Photoshop

Embedded profiles are, by far, the safest way to save your colour choices when you transfer a document from your monitor to several output destinations. Whether you work in RGB or CMYK, the embedded profile can save your images from faulty colour management. But, this process only works when all concerned understand what the profile stands for and why it’s there in the first place. In this article, Linda takes you through the basics on why and how to embed a profile into your document or image in Photoshop. In the process, you’ll also learn how to “soft proof” you document when you alter the RGB colour space to CMYK…

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753 Users read it.

Correcting lens and perspective distortion
by David Nicholls

Correcting lens and perspective distortion

When you photograph buildings, or any scene with strong vertical lines, your image will show, to varying degrees, distortions due to the lens and arising from the angle of view.  When you print the photograph these distortions are immediately obvious and can ruin an otherwise good print.  They can also make building a panorama from several distorted photographs very difficult, even if the distortions are slight.

There are specialist cameras and lenses you can use to avoid these problems, but unless you're a professional photographer, these are probably outside your budget.  Fortunately with digital image processing, we can correct most or all of these distortions.  There are quite a number of ways to do this, and for different image editing software applications there are different approaches.

This article shows how to do this using Photoshop CS2, PaintShop Pro 8, Fireworks (4, MX, MX2004, 8) and earlier versions of Photoshop and PSP using plugins from theimagingfactory.com.

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4877 Users read it.

Creating Buttons and Tabbed Interfaces in Photoshop
by Zac Van Note

Creating Buttons and Tabbed Interfaces in Photoshop

The State of the Button

Hyperlinks are the glue that holds the web together. Without an easy way to navigate from page to page, we would never find all the useful information on the internet. Of course, blue underlined hyperlinks don’t give your site much flexibility. That’s where buttons come in. Buttons have been around on the web for about as long as Mosaic brought graphical browsing to the masses back in the early ‘90s. The styles and colors have changed over the years; from simple flat color buttons to colorful glossy buttons, we’ve seen it all. There now seems to be a fairly even split between approaches to buttons in web interfaces. On one side are the minimalist buttons that just give a hint that they’re clickable, often with no graphics in sight. At the other end are buttons that take their job seriously and use various graphical tricks to make their ‘clickability’ obvious.

Buttons generally consist of a distinct colored area, a text label in the middle and beveled edges of some kind that beckon the user to come over and click it. This much hasn’t changed. If you do a bit of surfing on the web, you’ll see lots of flat color buttons, tabs and buttons with gentle gradients, orb or pill-shaped 3-D buttons and many variations in between. Most of these buttons include a roll-over effect that changes the look of the button or text when you roll your mouse over the ‘live area’. The roll-over or ‘hover-over’ effect can be achieved with or without images or even JavaScript. Most cutting-edge techniques stress clean code that works in any situation which means little or no JavaScript, and little to no images in navigation. The choice is ultimately yours and the content and tone of your site will dictate which approach makes the most sense.

This article discusses the most prominent styles and how you can create them in Photoshop and Dreamweaver. Along the way, I’ll give you numerous examples and additional resources. Let’s get started…

 
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